Gulf Coast - A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts
Contact Gulf Coast Magazine
Gulf Coast Blog

Trackbacks

No Trackbacks

Comments
Display comments as (Linear | Threaded)

Sam, I'm just delighted to see this -- it feels like an aspect of this electic, amazing and self-transforming poet that's barely been mentioned. I've never seen these books, and now you make me want them. His interest in bringing ingredients almost whole into his poems (Wordsworth, Blake and Samuel Palmer in the first two books, Milton later on) feels akin to making harmonious dishes,
"originality" achieved by unexpected decisions. (You become yourself by means of the ways you put things together?) Anyway, would you consider sending some of that jalapeno corn bread to NYC?
Comment (1)
#1 Mark Doty on 2011-03-16 10:19 (Reply)
Thanks, and I know what you mean Mark.

With the leftover cornbread, he recommends cutting it in half, heavily buttering both sides, making a tinfoil basket, and broiling it for a couple of minutes.
Comment (1)
#1.1 Samuel Amadon on 2011-03-16 11:07 (Reply)
Appreciated seeing this. RJ's "Southwest Cooking, New and Old" is another classic (revising "Aficionado's"), as is "Simple Fare"'s companion, "Company Fare." (Which includes a roasted chicken with red wine vinegar and juniper berries recipe that's incredible.) The original title for "Simple Fare" was "When the Cupboard Is Bare," an indication of the humble reality of many a poet's life. He was a master of scratching a meal together from whatever remainders were sitting on the shelves (as I was lucky to experience a time or two). (Don't pass up trying the incredible "Thing" from "American Table." Shockingly delicious, even with the cottage cheese!)

Flood Editions is re-issuing ARK in the coming year, in a corrected edition (correcting typesetter's errors and some proofreading problems). It will be a beautiful book.
Comment (1)
#2 Peter O'Leary on 2011-03-16 12:05 (Reply)

Add Comment

Enclosing asterisks marks text as bold (*word*), underscore are made via _word_.
Standard emoticons like :-) and ;-) are converted to images.

To prevent automated Bots from commentspamming, please enter the string you see in the image below in the appropriate input box. Your comment will only be submitted if the strings match. Please ensure that your browser supports and accepts cookies, or your comment cannot be verified correctly.
CAPTCHA

 
 
Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts Centerforward Web Services Squidz Ink Design